George Mason University

 

Mason Nanotechnology Initiative

     
     
Picture of Danial Anderson

 

Daniel M. Anderson

Email: danders1-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Department of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science


        I am interested in developing mathematical modeling and scientific computing techniques to study problems arising in nanoscience and nanotechnology that involve fluid dynamics. Particular topics may involve capillary phenomena occuring during the spreading of micro- and nano-scale fluid droplets on solid substrates, fluid flow through nano-scale porous media, and flows in microchannels.

     

     
Picture of Barney Bishop

 

Barney Bishop

Email: bbishop1-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
College of Science


        The proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria represents a significant risk to human health. Natural selection has evolved mechanisms by which higher organisms utilize biomolecules such as peptides to neutralize potential invading pathogens. These molecules provide models for understanding how to combat infection under physiological conditions. I am interested in employing protein/peptide design and nanoengineering principles in order to investigate these antimicrobial peptides and develop novel therapeutic strategies and technologies at the nanoscale.

     

Picture of Estela Blaisten

 

Estela Blaisten-Barojas

Email: blaisten-at-gmu.edu

Director of Computational Materials Science Center
Professor of Computational Physics
Computational and Data Sciences Department
College of Science


         Clusters of atoms and molecules display structural and dynamical properies that are in the nanometer and nanosecond length and time scales.  For that reason the study of their electronic, thermodynamic, and structural properties is of importance in several processes leading to the design of new devices in nanelectronics, optics, ceramics, aerogels, just to mention a few.  We have contibuted to undertand several of these processes with studies in which we simulate the cluster dynamics at the atomic level.  To achieve that we develop novel interaction models to represent the intermolecular forces between atoms of metallic clusters and of several molecular clusters such as conducting polymers, silica and calcite.  Publications

     

Picture of Felix Buot
 

Felix A. Buot

Email: fbuot-at-gmu.edu

Research Professor
Computational Materials Science Center
College of Science


        My research interest centers on quantum transport physics, theory, modeling, and simulation. My research resulted in the quantum superfield theoretical formulation of nonequilibrium many-body physics, pioneered the lattice Weyl transformation techniques, and their application to nanoelectronic, optoelectronic and nano-optical devices. While at NRL, my group pioneered the time-dependent numerical simulation of the quantum distribution-function transport equation of resonant tunneling devices, which exhibit various novel nonlinear quantum effects applicable to information processing, communication, and sensor applications.

     

 

Maria Emilianenko

Email: memelian-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
Department of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science


        My research is in the area of applied mathematics with main focus on scientific computing and development of efficient models and numerical algorithms. In particular, I'm interested in developing predictive models for microstructure evolution in polycrystalline materials, such as metals, ceramics or semiconductors, which play important role in modern nanotechnology and other engineering applications. While the structure of these materials is determined by microscopic properties, the interplay between these elements determines macroscopic behavior. Analysis, modeling and simulation of these complex multiscale phenomena is performed with the help of the tools ranging from the theory of PDEs, statistical physics to stochastic analysis and probability theory as well as various simulation techniques. Other directions of research include design of fast new algorithms for quantization and clustering with the use of the concepts like centroidal Voronoi tessellations, optimization of phase diagrams calculation for complex multicomponent materials and mathematical models in biology.

     

 

Rajesh Ganesan

Email: rganesan-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
Volgeneau School of Engineering
Systems Engineering & Operations Research Department


         Dr. Rajesh Ganesan's research interests include real time process monitoring and control of nanomachining processes. The research uses wavelet based multiscale statistical analysis approach to monitoring and control of nanoscale processes. Applications in Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP), a key step in silicon wafer manufacturing, are being researched. Some of his published work includes wavelet based identification of delamination defect in CMP using nonstationary acoustic emission signal, and accurate end point detection in CMP using wavelet analysis and sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). Currently, research is ongoing to develop process control algorithms for the CMP processes.

 

 

Igor Griva

Email: igriva-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
Department of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science


         My research involves developing new primal-dual algorithms for nonlinear constrained optimization, their mathematical analysis, efficien t implementation and application to problems in computational learning, radiation treatment planning, power generation and transmission. My optimization based computational analysis includes investigation of light enhancement and propagation in nanostructures and estima tion of electron transfer rates in proteins and molecular wires.

     

 

Robert V. Honeychuck

Email: rhoneych-at-gmu.edu

Associate Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
College of Science

 

    We are developing a laboratory program with preparative and analytical components to research the placement of certain organic molecules onto graphite in defined arrays. The overall philosophy is to use bottom-up (building) techniques in addition to/as a eplacement for top-down (lithographic) methods. The structures to be made include ono- and multi-layered collections of molecules placed on solid planar surfaces with exact XY coordinates. The expected applications are in molecular or multi-molecular scale electronics, ultra-sensitive chemical detection, and anti-microbial surfaces for heavily used public items such as doorknobs and escalator hand rails. Use of standard lithographic techniques in conjunction with the deposition of organics will help in the validation phase.

 

 
 

Dimitris Ioannou

Email: dioannou-at-ece.gmu.edu

Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Volgeneau School of Engineering
Dept of Electrical and Computer Engineering


         His research interests in nanotechnology are in the area of Silicon on Insulator (SOI) nanodevices and nanoelectronics. He has wide experience on SOI technology, covering basic materials studies, device physics and characterization, hot carrier reliability and electrostatic discharge protection, and SOI integrated circuit design for high performance and low-power/low-voltage applications. His current emphasis is on nanoscale SOI transistors and multigate structures, and design of integrated circuits based on these structures, including devise physics considerations that allow to take best advantage of the properties of these unique structures. He has long established, strong collaborations with (among others) IBM, AMD, Honeywell, Motorola, and NRL.

     

 

Fatah Kashanchi

Email: fkashanc-at-gmu.edu

Professor
College of Science
School of Systems Biology


         For the past twenty years his lab has been interested in understanding the mechanism of viral gene expression in human viruses and how the virus and the host control the dynamics of fundamental machineries needed for viral replication and/or host survival. His lab has ample experience with chromatin remodeling complexes and epigenetic modifications, host signaling events as therapeutic targets and investigating novel inhibitors to control viral replication. In recent years, they have started focusing on the use of humanized animals for many of their studies. The lab also has focused heavily on delivery of drugs and detection of viral and other significant organelles (exosomes) using nanotechnology. These include use of biodegradable molecules for packaging of therapeutics as well as use of nanoparticles in vitro to detect viruses and/or exosomes.

 

Dmitri Klimov

Email: dklimov-at-gmu.edu

Professor
School of Systems Biology
College of Science


        My research interests are focused on two areas of computational study of protein aggregation and unfolding. The first is focused on the assembly of Abeta amyloids, which cause Alzheimer's disease. The second involves the computational investigation of forced (mechanical) unfolding of proteins. The proposed research program is based on the all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins or peptides in explicit solvent. Both topics are highly important for understanding the molecular aspects of Alzheimer's disease and mechanical functions of proteins in living organisms.

 

Qiliang Li

Email: qli6-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
Volgeneau School of Engineering
Dept of Electrical and Computer Engineering


         Our research focuses on a broad area of solid state nanoelectronics materials and devices. We are interested in: (i) high performance nanoscale field effect transistor, the basic building block of all kinds of nanoelectronics device and circuitry, (ii) nanoscale SONOS-like non-volatile memory, (iii) highly sensitive nanoscale optical, chemical and bio sensors, (iv) nanoelectromechanical system, and (v) nanostructure-based dye-sensitized solar cells.

     

 

Lance Liotta

Email: lliotta-at-gmu.edu

Co-director
Applied Proteomics & Molecular Medicine
College of Science
Prince Williams Campus


         His research interests in proteonics belong to an active field of nanotechnology.

     

 

Carolina Salvador Morales

Email: csalvado-at-gmu.edu

Assitant Professor
Bioengineering Department
Volgeneau School of Engineering


         Her research interests in synthesis of functionalized metallic and polymeric nanoparticles, colloidal chemistry, and proteonics belong to active fields of nanotechnology.

     

 

John A. Schreifels

Email: jschreif-at-gmu.edu

Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
College of Science


        Ultra thin layers of compounds on a surface can control the surface properties of the material. Certain molecules decompose during their adsorption at very low coverage. An ultra thin layer (less than 1/3 of a monolayer) may form and be dispersed on the surface. These fragments can be characterized using CTPD, a temperature programmed desorption technique that was developed here and has been found to be essential for determining the identity of the decomposition fragments produced. This technique can also provide information about the way three dimensional nanostructures of this substance forming on the surface. Finally, changes in the electronic environment of the adsorbed compounds can be studied with photoelectron spectroscopy in the same instrument and just prior to performing CTPD studies.

 

Amarda Shehu

Email: amarda-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
Volgeneau School of Engineering


        My research is in the area of computational structural biology and biophysics with a focus on issues concerning the relationship between sequence, structure, dynamics, and function of biological molecules. In particular, my lab focuses on protein modeling, and we develop probabilistic search and optimization algorithms to feasibly compute structures, motions, and assembly of protein molecules. Our emphasis is on efficient yet accurate conformational search algorithms able to provide a detailed microscopic characterization of biological systems in terms of structural states available for the purpose of function and conformational rearrangements employed for the purpose of modulating function.

 

Howard Sheng

Email: hsheng-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
Department of Computational and Data Sciences
College of Science


         My interests focus on understanding the structure and property relationships of metastable materials, such as metallic glasses and nano-structured materials. Materials as such are characterized by their lack of long-range atomic periodicity (as in metallic glasses) or by their high degrees of defects (as in nano-structured materials). Owing to their unique structural features, these emerging materials exhibit unusual physical properties and play an important role in advanced technologies at the nanoscale and beyond. Current research areas include challenging topics on the frontier of metastable materials research: (1) Atomic-level structural analysis of amorphous materials; (2) Phase transitions in glasses and liquids; (3) Properties and their atomistic mechanisms of metastable materials. These endeavors involve extensive computer modeling and simulation of materials, varying from first-principles calculations based on quantum mechanics to large-scale classical molecular dynamics to continuum analysis. In addition to computer simulation, my research incorporates state-of-the-art structural characterization employing synchrotron X-ray diffraction conducted at Advanced Photon Source. Here, the research goal is to develop new computational algorithms and approaches to effectively deal with difficult problems in materials research, to understand fundamental issues in materials science, and to design new materials of scientific and technological importance.

 

Ming Tian

Email: mtian1-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
College of Science
Department of Physics and Astronomy


         Laser atomic spectroscopy, nonlinear and quantum optics, and quantum information. Currently focused on rare-earth based solid state quantum memory and quantum computation, which are the important elements in developing quantum information science and technology. The research topics also include laser spectroscopic properties of rare-earth ions trapped in inorganic crystals at cryogenic temperature, the coherent and incoherent processes under the excitation of composite laser pulses, and the influence of the static electric and magnetic fields. Study of these processes provides the information needed to set up the physical systems to demonstrate quantum memory and quantum computation and analyze and optimize the performance. Research activities include experimental investigation and theoretical modeling of mechanisms at the nanoscale.

 

 

Boris Veytsman

Email: bveytsma-at-gmu.edu

Affiliate Professor
Computational Materials Science Center
College of Science


        My interest focus is theoretical modeling and statistical physics of complex systems: fluids, polymers, liquid crystals, etc. Of particular interest are phase transitions, phase boundaries, and interface phenomena, molecular ordering at nanoscales and the influence of nanoscopic structure of materials on their macroscopic properties.

 

Erhai Zhao

Email: ezhao2-at-gmu.edu

Assistant Professor
College of Science
School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences


         My research focuses on superconducting materials and quantum transport in mesoscopic and nanoscale heterostructures. I have a persisten t interest in superconductors driven out of equilibrium, especially in spatial inhomogeneous systems. Modeling and understanding their d ynamics require techniques in quantum field theory and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The research is driven by the spectacular s uccess of fabricating superconducting nanostructures and circuits for electronic, spintronic, as well as quantum computing applications. More broadly, we investigate the transport properties of mesoscopic to nano-devices based on correlated heterostructures. Other interes ts include strongly correlated superconductors, which refer to superconducting and related phases arising from lattice systems with stro ng local repulsive interaction (doped Mott insulators), and topological superconductors. These are primarily motivated by ongoing experi ments in transition metal oxides and doped topological insulators.

     

 

People

D. Anderson
B. Bishop
E. Blaisten-Barojas
F.A. Buot
M. Emilianenko
R. Ganesan
I. Griva
R. Honeychuck
D. Ioannou
F. Kashanchi
D. Klimov
Q. Li
L. Liotta
C. Salvador Morales
J.A. Schreifels
A. Shehu
H. Sheng
C. Smith
M. Tian
B. Veytsman
E. Zhao